Adding Adult Guinea Fowl to Land

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I have wanted Guineas on my land from the moment I bought it.  I got the land for a song because it was grown over and turned to weed – so of course the ticks and bugs are horrendous.

I never got any birds because I had heard horror stories of how that introducing adult guineas to a farm would be a waste as any guinea fowl not raised on the land would not stay on the land.

I wasn’t ready to start with keets because I had been warned they die extremely easy and I did not want to try to grow out day old guinea keets on a plot an hour from my home.

Luckily I found a man that has spent his life breeding these tick eating machines and when I told him my problem he taught me a trick to successfully go about adding Adult Guinea fowl to my property.

The trick is to understand the animal.  Guineas love to roam and can cover huge distances daily – but they follow a path and roost in the same area each night.  They also are social animals and do their daily route together.

I was told that if you take advantage of their social nature they will stay.

The trick is to confine them all for 5-7 days,

then let out 3 (three is the minimum number for them to safely roost) any less than three and they are racoon food

Each day after that let out one until you have 3-5 left in the cage.

Keep the last birds confined a month.

I know this works with goats, as I let my buck out of the pen and he always comes back to his young doe friend.  I figured I would try it.

Sure enough when I let the guineas out they stay around the pen.

I am having problems with owls killing the ones outside and a raccoon reaching into the pen at night – but I haven’t lost any from them leaving.  Just them being ate.

Legacy Food Storage