Free PDF: Handbook of Rock Excavation Methods and Cost

Handbook of Rock Excavation Methods and Cost
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Handbook of Rock Excavation Methods and Cost is a rare book, try finding any modern book on hand mining techniques and prepare for frustration.

This PDF is of an old text from the late 1800’s which is the height of men digging mine shafts by hand. Continue reading “Free PDF: Handbook of Rock Excavation Methods and Cost”

Free PDF: H-12-F Home Fallout Shelter Lean to Shelter Basement Plan F

H-12-F Home Fallout Shelter Lean to Shelter Basement Plan F
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H-12-F Home Fallout Shelter Lean to Shelter Basement Plan F is for a pre-built wood components stored in the basement may be assembled and filled with bricks or concrete blocks for emergency protection.

This shelter design will provide 54 square feet of area and approximately 216 cubic feet of space. It will house three persons. The shelter length can be increased by increments of 3 foot panels. The height may be in- creased by the use of more materials.

Continue reading “Free PDF: H-12-F Home Fallout Shelter Lean to Shelter Basement Plan F”

Free PDF: H-12-B Home Fallout Shelter Modified Ceiling Shelter Basement Plan B

H-12-B Home Fallout Shelter Modified Ceiling Shelter Basement Plan B
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This home fallout shelter is a modified version of version of FEMA’s Plan A.  They are both basement shelters build of reinforced masonry, and both take a single person about two days to build.

The biggest difference between this fallout shelter and plan A is the type of bricks.

the first plan uses several types of block, whereas plan b uses 2 1/4 x 4 x 8 brick (and a lot of them – over 2500). Continue reading “Free PDF: H-12-B Home Fallout Shelter Modified Ceiling Shelter Basement Plan B”

Free PDF: H-12-A Home Fallout Shelter Modified Ceiling Shelter Basement Plan A

H-12-A Home Fallout Shelter Modified Ceiling Shelter Basement Plan A
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In this PDF, the fallout shelter is a ceiling shelter in which protection is provided in a basement corner by bricks or concrete blocks between the overhead joists. A beam and jack column support the extra weight.

FEMA considered this one of the better plans in low risk areas.  Remember this is a fallout shelter, not a bomb shelter.

It was designed to protect against radiological contamination by providing a relatively low cost mass. Continue reading “Free PDF: H-12-A Home Fallout Shelter Modified Ceiling Shelter Basement Plan A”

Free PDF: H-2-2 Aboveground Home Shelter

H-2-2 Aboveground Home Shelter
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The H-2-2 Aboveground Home Shelter is intended for persons who prefer an aboveground shelter or, for some reason such as a high water table, cannot have a belowground shelter. In general, below- ground shelter is superior and more economical than an above ground shelter.

The shelter is designed to meet the standard of protection against fallout radiation that has been established by the Federal Emergency Management Agency for public fallout shelters. It can also be constructed to provide significant protection from the effects of hurricanes, tornadoes, and earthquakes, and limited protection from the blast and fire effects of a nuclear explosion. 1/ It has sufficient space to shelter six adults. Continue reading “Free PDF: H-2-2 Aboveground Home Shelter”