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Descriptive Chemistry (1903)

Descriptive Chemistry
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Descriptive Chemistry is intended for teachers who wish to emphasize the facts, laws,
theories, and applications of chemistry. It is divided into two parts.

Part I contains the text, together with exercises and problems.

Part II contains the experiments.

The text has been selected and arranged with special reference to the needs of teachers as well as to the capacity of students. The experiments have been prepared to meet the needs of those schools in which the laboratory facilities are limited or the time for chemistry is short.

The point of view differs from that in the author’s “Experimental Chemistry,” but the spirit is the same. The two books are companion volumes, though of course they’ can be used independently. The cordial reception given the “Experimental Chemistry” shows that many teachers are  emphasizing the experimental side of chemistry. These teachers will find Part I of the “Descriptive Chemistry” a serviceable companion book both in the laboratory and class room. It has been bound as a separate volume to meet
such a use.

Solutions of problems, answers to some of the exercises, and references to the literature have been put in a separate Teacher’s Handbook. The manuscript has been read by Dr. William B. Schober, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania; Mr. Franklin T. Kurt, Chauncey Hall School, Boston, Massachusetts; and Mr. George M. Turner, Masten Park High School, Buffalo, New York. The chapters on theory were also read by Dr. Alexander Smith of the University of Chicago, and the chapters on carbon by Dr. James F. Norris of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The proof has been read by Dr. E. H. Kraus, High School, Syracuse, New York; Professor E. S. Babcock, Alfred University, Alfred, New York; and Mr. E. R. Whitney, High School, Binghamton, New York. The author is grateful to these teachers for their criticism, but he assumes all responsibility for any errors which may be detected.

Descriptive Chemistry (1903)
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