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Emergency Measurements of Radioactivity in Water & Food (1952)

Emergency Measurements of Radioactivity in Water & Food (1952)
I’d rather have stored food than decide how much radiologicaly contaminated food I could eat

Emergency Measurements of Radioactivity in Water & Food (1952) is another Civil Defense Technical Bulletin.  I used to have a little sealed tin that FEMA/Civil Defense placed in the old cold war shelters.

The idea was to compare the readings between the known source and the water you wanted to drink, and as long as the readings were smaller in the water you wished to drink than the known sample the water was “safe” enough for drinking in an emergency.

I think I would rather keep my own food and water stored in the safety of my home rather than take chances with how much is too much….

This bulletin presents a method of measuring radioactivity in food and drinking water, ,and describes a method of preparing a radioactive comparison standard designed to provide a check against the following 10- and 30-day acceptable
beta-gamma concentrations.

The picture to the right is a CD V-787 (the tin described above).  It was a low intensity harmless radioactive comparison standard which provides a method of measuring radioactivity in food and drinking water by comparing it’s reading against the beta-gamma concentration in a food or water sample with a beta-gamma geiger counter having a range of 0-50 mr/hr.

Emergency Measurements of Radioactivity in Water & Food (1952)
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