Free PDF: Poisoning and Universal Antidote

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This PDF is called Poisoning and Universal Antidote, I don’t know the author and I would take this document with a grain of salt.

If this is something you are thinking about trying please discuss it with your doctor.  I know that activated charcoal is used in the emergency treatment of certain kinds of poisoning.

It helps prevent the poison from being absorbed from the stomach into the body. Sometimes, several doses of activated charcoal are needed to treat severe poisoning.  I also know that there are studies that suggest plain activated charcoal is more effective that the “universal antidote”.

However, in my own personal research, ground up charcoals is not “activated charcoal”. Activated charcoal, is a form of carbon processed to have small, low-volume pores that increase the surface area available for adsorption or chemical reactions.

Activated carbon is carbon produced from carbonaceous source materials such as bamboo, coconut husk, willow peat, wood, coir, lignite, coal, and petroleum pitch. It can be produced by one of the following processes:

  • Physical activation: The source material is developed into activated carbons using hot gases in the range 600–1200 °C. Air is then introduced to burn out the gasses, creating a graded, screened and de-dusted form of activated carbon.
  • Chemical activation: Prior to carbonization, the raw material is impregnated with certain chemicals. The chemical is typically an acid, strong base, or a salt[12] (phosphoric acid, potassium hydroxide, sodium hydroxide, calcium chloride, and zinc chloride 25%). Then, the raw material is carbonized at lower temperatures (450–900 °C). I

I have seen several prepper websites show how to make activated charcoal, but the fact that I haven’t tried it myself shows that I am not convinced the process are either safe or actually make activated charcoal.

Poisioning and Universal Antidote
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