How to Make the Easiest Lye Soap Ever

Super Easy Lye Soap Technique

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I am not going to go into a lot of detail here, as this super easy lye soap technique will be in my new 52 Food Preservation Project book and I don’t want my publisher to beat me, but  I did want to introduce you to an easier way to make soap.

Soap has been on my list of projects I wanted to attempt for a LONG time – actually it was one of the things I put on my list when I started it.  However messing with the hot oil and lye scared me a little, so it kept being moved to the bottom of the list – after going from project 10 to project 1500 I decided that it was time to man up and try it.

This easy lye soap technique is called the room temperature method – while it may make purists upset, it is easier as you don’t heat any oils and you don’t have to check any temperatures.

Please take time to research how to make soap and take all the proper precautions before you try to make lye soap – as I don’t want you to hurt yourself.

How to Make the Easiest Lye Soap Ever

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound Lard (Also known as Manteca at the grocery)
  • 3 ounces Lye
  • 1 ounces Distilled Water (not tap, filtered, or bottles)

Equipment:

  • Non-reactive pot (stainless steel – not aluminum or cast iron)
  • Accurate scale
  • Wisk (once again non-reactive)
  • Soap Mold
  • Knife
  • Towels
  • Parchment paper (or thick plastic and tape)
  • Optional but you will thank me if you get one Immersion blender or electric blender (to only be used for soap making)

Procedure:

  1. Prepare your mold (see below)
  2. Weigh out and place lard into your pot.
  3. Prepare your lye solution by weighing out the water and the sodium hydroxide.
  4. Slowly pour the sodium hydroxide into the water and gently stir until the crystals dissolve. (it will get hot – and always add lye to water and not water to lye for safety reasons)
  5. Once the lye solution has become clear, slowly pour the lye water over the hard oils in your pot. The hot solution will melt the oils.
  6. Gently press the oils down into the lye solution with the whisk and slowly stir until the oils are completely melted.
  7. Add the liquid oils to the soap pot and whisk together.
  8. Using your stick blender, mix the soap batter in short bursts alternating with hand stirring until the soap reaches a thin trace.
  9. Pour into your prepared soap mold.
  10. Cover the soap
  11. Wrap and insulate until the soap sets.
  12. As soon as the soap has cooled to the touch and is firm enough to handle, you can cut it into bars.
  13. Cure the soap for 4 to 6 weeks. (this makes the soap more mild and less harsh on your skin)

Yield:

Approximately 1 ½ pounds of soap

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2 Comments

  1. Scott Warren

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